Searchable, peer-reviewed, open-access proceedings from bioscience and biomedical conferences
Previous issue | Volume 1 | REDR1980

Reproductive Endocrinology of Domestic Ruminants

Reproductive Endocrinology of Domestic Ruminants

(1)

Editorial: Reproduction in Domestic Ruminants
Webb R  
Division of Animal Science, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, UK
bp0001editorial
A critique of the evidence on the importance of steroid feedback to seasonal changes in gonadotrophin secretion
Reproductive Endocrinology Program, Departments of Physiology and Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, U.S.A.
bp0001redr1
The role of the pineal gland in seasonality
The University of Adelaide, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia 5011 and *Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Kybybolite, South Australia 5262
bp0001redr2
Role of melatonin and circadian rhythms in seasonal reproduction in rams
Medical Research Council Reproductive Biology Unit, Centrefor Reproductive Biology, 37, Chalmers Street, Edinburgh EH3 9EW, and *Department of Biochemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 5XH, U.K.
bp0001redr3
Control of seasonal reproduction in sheep and goats by light and hormones
I.N.R.A., C.R.A.A.G., Station de Recherches Zootechniques, 97170 Petit-Bourg, French West Indies
bp0001redr4
Endocrine control of spermatogenesis in the ram
I.N.R.A.—Station de Physiologie de la Reproduction, 37380 Nouzilly, France
bp0001redr5
The effect of intrauterine gonadectomy on fetal and neonatal gonadotrophin secretion in the lamb
Medical Research Centre, Prince Henry's Hospital, St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004. and †Department of Agriculture and Reproduction Research Section, S.S. Cameron Laboratory, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia
bp0001redr6
Cryptorchidism and the pituitary—testicular axis in bulls
Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Science and Education Administration Agricultural Research, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Clay Center, Nebraska 68933, U.SA.
bp0001redr7
Endocrine mechanisms governing transition into adulthood in female sheep
Reproductive Endocrinology Program, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Division of Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, U.S.A.
bp0001redr8
Basic neuroendocrine events before puberty in cattle, sheep and pigs
I.N.R.A., Physiologie de la Reproduction, 37380 Nouzilly, and *I.N.R.A., Elevage des Pores, 78350 Jouy en Josas, France
bp0001redr9
Endocrine patterns associated with puberty in male and female cattle
Lehrstuhl für Physiologie der Fortpflanzung und Laktation, Technische Universität München, D-8050 Freising-Weihenstephan, West Germany, and *Department of Animal Physiology, University of Nairobi, Kenya
bp0001redr10
Effects of LH-RH infusion, castration and cryptorchidism on gonadotrophin and testosterone secretion in developing rams
Medical Research Centre, Prince Henry’s Hospital, Melbourne 3004 and Animal Research Institute, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia
bp0001redr11
Gonadotrophic control of follicular development and function during the oestrous cycle of the ewe
M.R.C. Reproductive Biology Unit and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Centre for Reproductive Biology, 37 Chalmers Street, Edinburgh EH3 9EW, U.K.
bp0001redr12
Folliculogenesis in the sheep as influenced by breed, season and oestrous cycle
I.N.R.A., Physiologie de la Reproduction, 37380 Nouzilly, France
bp0001redr13
Hormonal and cellular interactions in follicular steroid biosynthesis by the sheep ovary
M.R.C. Group in Reproductive Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada and *Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University of Adelaide, Australia
bp0001redr14
Endocrine patterns of the post-partum cow
Department of Physiology & Environmental Studies, University of Nottingham School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Nr Loughborough, Leics LEI 2 5RD, U.K.
bp0001redr15
Blastocyst—endometrial interactions in early pregnancy in the sheep
Medical Research Centre, Prince Henry’s Hospital, St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Australia 3004
bp0001redr16
Factors regulating receptors for LH on ovine luteal cells
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, U.S.A.
bp0001redr17
The early pregnancy factor of sheep and cattle
C.S.I.R.O., Division of Animal Production, P.O. Box 239, Blacktown, N.S.W., 2148, Australia
bp0001redr18
Control of luteal function during early pregnancy in sheep
Institul National de la Recherche Agronomique, Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Lactation, C.N.R.Z.-78350 Jouy-en-Josas, France
bp0001redr19
Control and induction of ovulation in cattle
Agricultural Institute, Grange, Co. Meath, Ireland, and *Department of Dairy Science Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, U.S.A.
bp0001redr20
A changed responsiveness to oestrogen in ewes with clover disease
Division of Animal Health, CSIRO, Institute of Agriculture, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009
bp0001redr21
Plasma hormone concentrations associated with early embryo mortality in heifers
Department of Physiology, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, U.S.A.
bp0001redr22
The effect of suckling upon the endocrine changes associated with anoestrus in identical twin dairy cows
Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Research Division, Ruakura Animal Research Station, Private Bag, Hamilton, New Zealand
bp0001redr23